Remy & Serena Lead "Black Women's Equal Pay Day"

Remy Ma and Serena Williams lead the way as black women honor "Black Women's Equal Pay Day" today.

July 31st is Black Women's Equal Pay Day, which represents the number of days into 2017 a black woman must work to earn the same pay a white man made in 2016 — that's nearly 8 extra months! 

Black women are the cornerstone of our communities, they are phenomenal, and they deserve equal pay.

Read more about this day here.

July 31 is Black Women's Equal Pay Day, which represents the number of days into 2017 a black woman must work to earn the same pay a white man made in 2016 — that's nearly 8 extra months! Black women are the cornerstone of our communities, they are phenomenal, and they deserve equal pay.

A post shared by Remy Ma (@remyma) on

July 31 is Black Women's Equal Pay Day, which represents the number of days into 2017 a black woman must work to earn the same pay a white man made in 2016 — that's nearly 8 extra months! Black women are the cornerstone of our communities, they are phenomenal, and they deserve equal pay.

A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on

Today, July 31, is #BlackWomensEqualPayDay, which represents the number of days into 2017 a Black woman must work to earn the same pay a white man made in 2016. All day, we’ll be sharing stories of phenomenal Black women fighting for equity in the workplace. The first is from Women’s March Youth Coordinator, @tabithastb. • "I came to NY at age 19. At age 23, fresh out of college, I took the first full time job I could get because I had to. I needed to work legally and would do just about anything to stay in America. I stayed in that low paying full time job longer than I should have because I honestly didn't think I could get another job with security and benefits. I remember coming home and being too tired to take off my contacts. I remember my aunt telling me "that's not the only job in the world, you know". I didn't believe anyone would hire me for a higher salary. An immigrant. A black woman. I remember looking at my then-boyfriend's salary out of college and realizing how much more he made and the fact that he fully expected to make more. I still feel gratitude for the job but I am floored at the psychological effects of being a WOC in the workplace and all the subtle messaging I was privy to. Most of the people around me were WOC. Most were in the same position. When you looked past a certain level in the company, almost all of the people are white. I literally had to challenge myself to dream and stretch myself beyond the limits around me. I am thankful for WOC supervisors in that workplace who pushed me to pursue my dreams. I am still not beyond hustling and doing the do but now I'm following my path of being a designer as opposed to being a part of a system that has no space for me to shine in my best self and does not reward my hard work with a live-able wage while finding the resources to reward others."

A post shared by Women's March (@womensmarch) on

Comments

Angie Martinez

Angie Martinez

Angie Martinez is recognized as one of the most influential personalities in popular culture and multi-media. Originally known as “The Voice of New York,” Angie’s nearly 20 years of on-air hosting experience has led her to become the media... Read more

title

Content Goes Here

This ad will close in X seconds.